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Fear Not

“We ought always to thank God for you, brothers and sisters, and rightly so, because your faith is growing more and more, and the love all of you have for one another is increasing.” -2 Thessalonians 1:3

These are unprecedented times, and it’s been inspiring to see so many neighbors, churches, communities, and companies stepping up to meet the challenges we are all facing. When news first broke of businesses and churches closing to prevent the spreading of Coronavirus (COVID-19) there was some panic. For some, that panic did not result in fear for themselves, but rather fear for their elderly neighbors, school aged children who lack resources for food, and downtown neighbors who depend on churches  and nonprofits for meals. In the midst of panic and fear of the unknown, many individuals have expressed love and faith for their brothers and sisters when it is needed the most. I cannot imagine a greater love for one another than an act of selflessness during a global pandemic. Fear is only time wasted because God tells us to "fear not," his message encouraging us to have faith in him instead. For he knows what has been, what is, and what will be. Our intentions during this time, our actions during these challenges demonstrate an opportunity to creatively show that our faith has no boundaries. So instead of fear, share kindness. Instead of greed, share grace... instead of desperation, share hope. Although we might not be together, you brothers and sisters are in our prayers. May your faith be growing and your love for one another be increasing to sustain us through this tough time.

-Kimberly Liebowitz

Posted by Kimberly Liebowitz with

The Light of the World

“When Jesus spoke again to the people, he said, “I am the light of the world. Whoever follows me will never walk in darkness, but will have the light of life.”  -John 8:12

There is no denying we are living in some dark days right now. On Ash Wednesday, there were 14 confirmed cases of COVID-19 in the United States, and no reported deaths. Today, just 4 weeks later, there are over 46,500 cases in the U.S., with 600 deaths. Across the world, more than 17,100 people have been killed by the virus. We are being instructed to “shelter in place” just to give our medical personnel and facilities a fighting chance to deal with the ever-growing demand for services. Many persons are experiencing a loss of income and many businesses a loss of revenue. Travel is at a standstill. More and more people are isolated every day. Yes, these are dark days indeed.

John reports that we can find light for our lives in Jesus Christ. The Message translation says it this way: Jesus once again addressed them, “I am the world’s light. No one who follows me stumbles around in the darkness. I provide plenty of light to live in.” Just like we stumble around in the darkness when we don’t turn on the light, so we lose our way in daily life when everything grows dark in the world. Jesus is the one who brings us light in the darkness. We do not have to lose our way, for we find our way in Jesus.

I don’t mean to sound simplistic or appear to be wearing rose-colored glasses, but our claim and our faith as Christians is that in Jesus, we find light for our lives. This light helps us stay positive even in the darkest days. This light gives us hope in the future. This light helps to dispel worries and despair. Our trust is in the one who overcame death and is the light of the world.

And we can use this affirmation in these dark days to help others see the way forward. We can share our faith with others by reaching out through phone and text and email, offering a positive word of encouragement. We may be physically distancing but we can be virtually connecting, sharing the light of Jesus with others. I’m remind of a story of Alexander Papaderos, a teacher on the island of Crete. He recounts how someone once asked him, “What is the meaning of life?” to which he responded, “Do you really want to know? I will tell you.”

Taking his wallet out of his hip pocket, he fished into a leather billfold and brought out a very small round mirror, about the size of a quarter. "When I was a small child, during the war, we were very poor and we lived in a remote village. One day, on the road, I found the broken pieces of a mirror. A German motorcycle had been wrecked in that place.

"I tried to find all the pieces and put them together, but it was not possible, so I kept only the largest piece. This one. And by scratching it on a stone I made it round. I began to play with it as a toy and became fascinated by the fact that I could reflect light into dark places where the sun would never shine -- in deep holes and crevices and dark closets. It became a game for me to get light into the most inaccessible places I could find.

"I kept the little mirror, and as I went about my growing up, I would take it out in idle moments and continue the challenge of the game. As I became a man, I grew to understand that this was not just a child's game but a metaphor for what I might do with my life. I came to understand that I am not the light or the source of light. But light is there, and it will only shine in many dark places if I reflect it.

"I am a fragment of a mirror whose whole design and shape I do not know. Nevertheless, with what I have I can reflect light into the dark places of this world -- into the black places in the hearts of men -- and change some things in some people. Perhaps others may see and do likewise. This is what I am about. This is the meaning of my life."

May we all shine the light of the world into the dark places we encounter, not only in these troubling times, but in all the days of our lives.

-Bob Winstead 

Posted by Bob Winstead with

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